18.09.2017

Climate Change made Australia’s warmest winter on record an astounding 60 times more likely, our new report highlights.

The “Hot & Dry: Australia’s Weird Winter,” report shows the nation experienced its warmest winter on record (for average maximum temperatures), while more than 260 heat and low rainfall records were also broken throughout the season.

Climate Councillor and ecologist, Professor Lesley Hughes said Australia’s hottest winter in history was related to worsening climate change.

“Without any meaningful action to tackle climate change, we will continue to see many more hot winters, just like this, as global temperatures rise,” she said.

“We must take meaningful action to strongly reduce Australia’s emissions from fossil fuels.”

CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD THE REPORT

KEY FINDINGS INCLUDE:

  • Australia had its warmest winter on record, in terms of average maximum temperatures, reaching nearly 2ºC above average.
  • More than 260 heat and low rainfall records were broken during the winter months.
  • The nation experienced its second driest June on record and the driest winter since 2002.
  • The exceptionally warm and dry winter was made 60 times more likely by climate change.
  • Australia’s average winter temperatures have increased by around 1ºC since 1910, driven by climate change, as a direct result of burning fossil fuels – coal, oil and gas.
  • Winter warm spells are lasting longer, occurring more often and becoming more intense.

 

 

Flowers photographed on Wildflower Walk

Photo  Credit: Marj Webber

Some 90 participants joined BIEPA’s annual “Wonders of the Wallum” Wildflower Walk on Sunday, 3 September, through heathland at the top of Cotterill Avenue, Bongaree. This event is part of the Sunshine Coast Wildflower Festival, which celebrated its 50th anniversary this year.

We were again blessed with perfect weather and many of the flower species were at their best. The groups of walkers appreciated the knowledge and experience of our guides – Allan Carr from Native Plants Queensland and John Ward from the Bribie Wallum Action Group and Community Nursery. There was also valuable input from Ron Powell and Michael Strong concerning the Aboriginal
history of the area and the significance of the various plants and trees to the first inhabitants. BIEPA would like to thank them all for their contribution to the success of this event.

We were pleased to see that this Walk attracted enthusiasts from outside the local area – including from Maroochydore and the Northern Rivers. We also welcomed some overseas visitors.

From the feedback received, it seemed that everyone had an interesting and enjoyable morning.

Wildflower Walk 2017

Photo Credit: Emma Carter

We look forward to welcoming you again next year!

 

The Joint Report was released on “National Threatened Species Day” – 7th September.

RSPCA Queensland records show that rescues of forest-dependent wildlife more than tripled from 2,331 in 2011 to 7,950 in 2016, with much of this increase put down to habitat destruction.

QLD This coincides with the news that more than 1 million hectares has been cleared in the past 4 years in Queensland.

Bulldozing of forests in Queensland has killed tens of millions of the wild Australian animals living there.

Why are we allowing this to happen? Who is responsible for allowing this to happen?
Scientists estimate tree-clearing in Queensland now kills 34 million animals each year: 900,000 mammals like koalas, possums, flying foxes and gliders, 2.6 million birds like cockatoos and 30.6 million reptiles including goannas, dragons, skinks and native geckos.

Koalas are front and centre of this animal welfare crisis and we all must do something to halt the carnage that has our native vegetation and wildlife on a fast track to extinction.

We are fast losing what makes Queensland, “Queensland”.

Please read more here: http://www.wwf.org.au/news/news/2017/tree-clearing-causing-queenslands-greatest-animal-welfare-crisis#gs.AvlXalw.

BIEPA Management Committee

Topic: Birds, particularly the Osprey

Guest Speaker: Pip Grant-Taylor from Osprey House

Pip will be regaling us with her extensive knowledge of birds, in particular the osprey.  Click on this National Geographic link to see some of Pip’s incredible photos: 

Pip also wrote and illustrated, “Talon the Aussie osprey: the ospreys of Osprey House”, a story of the first osprey chick hatched at Osprey House Environmental Centre near Brisbane.  It includes a design and instructions for a hanging osprey mobile.  An accompanying CD features two videos about Talon.

The BIEPA committee visited Osprey House recently and we featured it in our most recent BIEPA News.

Download the poster AugustMeeting2017 for more informtion.

Koalas

Did you know more than 80% of koalas have disappeared from Queensland’s Koala Coast due to excessive tree clearing? BIEPA was shocked too. That’s why BIEPA emailed a KIMBY (Koala In My Back Yard) to the Queensland Government to protect the habitat of koalas and other Australian wildlife.

Will you send one too?
Visit www.wwf.org.au/savekoalas to send yours now!”