Woorim Foreshore Community DayOur celebration of World Wetlands Day was quite WET and you may have decided not to attend because of the weather.
HERE IS YOUR CHANCE TO CELEBRATE AGAIN.
Friday 9th March at 8am
BIEPA members are invited to join the Rotary Club of Bribie Island and Conservation Volunteers of Australia (formerly WetlandCare Australia http://www.wetlandcare.com.au.) to enjoy a day of caring for the sensitive dune system and riparian habitat along the Woorim foreshore.
You will be planting endemic plants alongside other caring community members to ensure a healthy habitat for our endangered loggerhead turtles, migratory shorebirds and other resident birds and wildlife that call our coastal dunes home.
MORNING TEA AND LUNCH WILL BE PROVIDED.
See attached Woorim Foreshore Community Day for more information.
We look forward to seeing you there.
 
From your BIEPA Management Committee.

Monday 22/01/18

Topic: The discovery, development and science behind an innovative cane toad tadpole trapping technology

Guest Speaker: Dr Rob Capon, Institute of Molecular Bioscience, University of Queensland

Poster - Guest Speaker January 2018

Poster – Guest Speaker, January 2018

Case Study Report: Community Participation in Natural Resource Management

Samille Loch-Wilkinson ENVM7513 – Report – BIEPA

Monday 23/10/17

Topic: The Healthy Land and Water Report Card

Guest Speaker: Dr Paul Maxwell

The Healthy Land and Water Report Card provides an annual measure of the environmental pressures facing our catchments throughout South East Queensland. It provides an environmental condition grade (A-F) for each catchment and the level of ecosystem services (social and economic benefits) (1-5 stars) the waterways provide to local communities and what is being done to protect and improve them.

Dr Paul Maxwell is one of the key HL&W scientists responsible for this Report Card. He will give some background on how the Card is compiled and what the scores mean. He will outline the findings of the 2017 Card. The “environmental improvement” project, Bribie Island State High School students recently completed,

See POSTER November 2017 for more information. (In jpeg and pdf for your convenience)

No meeting in December, we look forward to seeing you next year.

BIEPA Management Committee

POSTER November 2017

November Meeting

solar energy

The suburbs where renewables rule (is yours on the list?)

They are the places where renewable energy is king, a group of 22 postcodes across Australia where more than half of all houses have rooftop solar.

As a nation we are wild for the power of the sun. Australia boasts 1.7 million homes with solar panels on the roof – a world-leading figure on a per capita basis. But within that achievement, which suburbs and towns are doing the best?

The list of 22 postcodes that are leading the way is contained in Renewables Ready, a report issued by the Climate Council this week.

So is your postcode on the list? Have a look at the chart at the bottom of this story and see how you and your neighbours measure up to Australia’s sun kings.

IMAGE: Adobe

Leading the charge is postcode 6171, Baldivis in Western Australia. The fast-growing suburb 46 km south of Perth has the highest penetration of rooftop solar anywhere in the nation at 69 per cent of all homes.

It is followed closely by the Queensland suburbs of Elimbah  (63 per cent uptake) and Tamborine (57 per cent).

Queensland is out in front of other states by some margin when it comes to rooftop solar, 14 of the 22 postcodes on the list are in the sunshine state. And most of those are tightly clustered in the state’s southeast. Overall, 31.6 per cent of households in Queensland have solar panels on their rooves, ahead of 30.5 per cent in South Australia and 25.4 per cent in Western Australia.

IMAGE: Renewables Ready, The Climate Council.

The figures come hot on the heels of others released by the Clean Energy Regulator, which this week revealed that rooftop solar uptake had soared in Australia and, together with solar hot water systems, now boasts capacity of 6000 MW – enough to power the entire city of Sydney.

Australia leads the world in per capita deployment of rooftop solar panels.

Western Australia has seen the largest increase in the uptake of rooftop solar during the past 12 months (a 2.9 per cent jump).

The below table (sourced from the report) shows the postcode with the highest rooftop solar uptake in each state.

The report foreshadows further gains to come from projects currently underway that promise even more dramatic concentration of solar powered homes.

In the coming Canberra suburb of Denman Prospect, it says, 100 per cent of homes being constructed will be required to install rooftop solar panels.

It also points to the ARENA-funded AGL Virtual Power Plant project in suburban Adelaide, which involves installing and connecting a large number of solar battery storage systems across 1000 residential and business premises, to be managed by a cloud-based control system. ARENA has contributed $5 million towards the $20 million cost of that project.

Here is the report’s full list of Australian postcodes that have more than 50 per cent of homes with rooftop solar systems.

The Climate Council document takes the form of a report card, grading each state for its performance on renewable energy in a number of areas.

It says the percentage of renewable sourced electricity grew in every state during the past 12 months, apart from Tasmania, which saw it slightly decline.

The nation as a whole produced enough renewable energy last year to power seven million homes, the report says (quoting figured from the Department of Environment and Energy). That represents a jump in renewables production of 8.6 per cent. The proportion of Australia’s electricity contributed by renewable sources rose from 14 per cent to 16 per cent.