WWF Newsletter May 2020

From the food that we eat to the air that we breathe, every one of us relies on nature for our survival. But when nature thrives, we get so much more – benefits to our health, our well-being and our prosperity.

Humanity is rightly focused on grappling with the COVID-19 pandemic right now. But the crisis of nature loss continues to deepen, and so improving our relationship with nature is more important than ever before.

This week, we would like to share some stories, from the Great Barrier Reef to the Arctic, that show how interconnected we are with our shared home – and that how we choose to regard nature ultimately impacts us all.

We are living in difficult times. But, no matter where we are in the world, we can help overcome both the health and nature crises by taking united action with others.

Together, it’s possible for us to secure a better future for all.

TIME TO TRANSFORM OUR RELATIONSHIP WITH NATURE

To help curb future pandemics, it is crucial that we greatly reduce the opportunities for viruses to jump from animals to people. First and foremost: the loss and degradation of natural habitats must be recognised as a key driver of emerging infectious diseases from wildlife.

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REQUIEM FOR A REEF

Even in the midst of a global health crisis, we should not let the rapid decline of the Great Barrier Reef – a source of wonder and a precious resource – pass without reflecting on what it means for the ocean and the many millions of people who depend on it.

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ARCTIC LIFELINE COULD BE CUT BY EXPANDING OFFSHORE OIL DRILLING

The marginal ice zone – the area where Arctic sea ice meets the open ocean – has supported unique biodiversity such as phytoplankton, zooplankton, fish, polar bears, birds, seals, and whales for millions of years. But now the area, already severely impacted by climate change, is threatened by oil producers tempted by the potential of untapped reserves.

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HOW A FORMER POACHER BECAME A WILDLIFE PROTECTOR

“He [my father] always told me to do good and take care of nature. When I started a family myself, I wanted to inherit nature for our future generations. I clearly could see we were losing our natural resources rapidly.” Former poacher Mister Muslim shares his story about solving conflicts between humans and elephants.

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BIEPA

Caring for our special habitat and its residents for 40 years!

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