BIEPA is indebted to our First Nations peoples who continue to share their wisdom in how they have been Caring for Country – Our Special Habitat and it’s Residents – for Millennia.

National Reconciliation Week 2020

National Reconciliation Week is a time for all Australians to reflect on our shared histories and relationships with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and explore how each of us can contribute to achieving reconciliation.

Reconciliation Week May 27th to June 3rd 2020

Reconciliation Week this year is a chance to celebrate and build on respectful relationships shared by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and other Australians and  explore how non-Aboriginal Australians can be active in promoting reconciliation.  Here’s some things that you could do:

Benarrawa Sorry Day Ceremony:

Topic: Benarrawa Sorry Day Ceremony 2020

Time: May 26, 2020 06:30 AM Brisbane

Join Zoom Meeting

https://zoom.us/j/97118918168?pwd=eG5VdVpRemZXa2s2bFl6TmdQNkE3Zz09

Meeting ID: 971 1891 8168

Password: Benarrawa

Watch a Video
https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=3&v=jBJ_OjnPgYA&feature=emb_logo

BIEPA IS PROVIDING A COPY OF A VERY INTERESTING STUDY BY SCIENTISTS AT CSIRO, Australia’s national science agency; Project AWARE, which is a global non-profit connecting community action and policy; and Ocean Conservancy, a US-based advocacy non-profit, that evaluated the relationship between land-based debris and what is found on corresponding seafloors. 
 
BIEPA MEMBER, RHYS WALKER, HAS BEEN APPLYING FOR AND USING GRANTS TO COLLECT MARINE DEBRIS FROM BRIBIE ISLAND’S WESTERN FORESHORE FOR THE PAST FOUR YEARS.
 
HIS REPORTS ON WHAT HE COLLECTS GO TO A RESEARCH DATABASE.
 
THANKS TO ALL THE VOLUNTEERS WHO WORK SO HARD TO GATHER THE NECESSARY DATA.  SEE ATTACHED REPORT ON RESEARCH THAT SHOWS GENERAL MISMATCH BETWEEN SHORELINES AND SEAFLOOR. 
 
IT WILL BE A GOOD DAY WHEN OUR OCEANS AND FORESHORES ARE CLEAN AGAIN.
Research shows general mismatch between shorelines and seafloor
The BIEPA Management Committee is asking you to help with BIEPA’s GOALS members identified in February 2019. 
We ask you to challenge the continuation of 4×4 recreational beach driving on Bribie Island.   
4×4 recreational driving is inappropriate and is unsustainable in National Parks. 
It is contrary to the international Conservation Conventions Australia signed to protect Bribie Island.
Our State MP, Ms Simone Wilson, has advertised in a local community newspaper, asking you to write giving feedback to her on this issue.
(See attached advertisement)
Please support BIEPA’s GOALS and have destructive 4×4 recreational beach driving banned from Bribie Island’s Ocean Beach.  
We also ask you to encourage others to write.
WRITE TO MS WILSON WITH YOUR IDEAS.
 
ATTACHED IS:
  1. AN INTRODUCTORY POSTER FROM BIEPA
  2. IDEAS AND SUGGESTIONS YOU MAY REFERENCE
  3. MAP OF BRIBIE ISLAND WITH DESIGNATED USES.                           (very little provides respite to wildlife from disturbance)
  4. MS WILSON’S INVITATION FOR YOU TO “HAVE YOUR SAY”
 
We hope the attachments are helpful to you. 
 Many thanks.
 BIEPA Management Committee
 Have your say

From the food that we eat to the air that we breathe, every one of us relies on nature for our survival. But when nature thrives, we get so much more – benefits to our health, our well-being and our prosperity.

Humanity is rightly focused on grappling with the COVID-19 pandemic right now. But the crisis of nature loss continues to deepen, and so improving our relationship with nature is more important than ever before.

This week, we would like to share some stories, from the Great Barrier Reef to the Arctic, that show how interconnected we are with our shared home – and that how we choose to regard nature ultimately impacts us all.

We are living in difficult times. But, no matter where we are in the world, we can help overcome both the health and nature crises by taking united action with others.

Together, it’s possible for us to secure a better future for all.

TIME TO TRANSFORM OUR RELATIONSHIP WITH NATURE

To help curb future pandemics, it is crucial that we greatly reduce the opportunities for viruses to jump from animals to people. First and foremost: the loss and degradation of natural habitats must be recognised as a key driver of emerging infectious diseases from wildlife.

Read the story

REQUIEM FOR A REEF

Even in the midst of a global health crisis, we should not let the rapid decline of the Great Barrier Reef – a source of wonder and a precious resource – pass without reflecting on what it means for the ocean and the many millions of people who depend on it.

Read the story

ARCTIC LIFELINE COULD BE CUT BY EXPANDING OFFSHORE OIL DRILLING

The marginal ice zone – the area where Arctic sea ice meets the open ocean – has supported unique biodiversity such as phytoplankton, zooplankton, fish, polar bears, birds, seals, and whales for millions of years. But now the area, already severely impacted by climate change, is threatened by oil producers tempted by the potential of untapped reserves.

Read the story

HOW A FORMER POACHER BECAME A WILDLIFE PROTECTOR

“He [my father] always told me to do good and take care of nature. When I started a family myself, I wanted to inherit nature for our future generations. I clearly could see we were losing our natural resources rapidly.” Former poacher Mister Muslim shares his story about solving conflicts between humans and elephants.

WWF BELIEVES IN PEOPLE AND NATURE THRIVING TOGETHER | VISIT PANDA.ORG TODAY

WWF INTERNATIONAL RUE MAUVERNEY 28  GLAND SWITZERLAND