Consultation on proposed changes to the management of gastropod and bivalve molluscs in Moreton Bay

BIEPA considers this an important enough issue to send you the Survey sent by the Queensland Government Department of Agriculture and Fisheries (DAF).

You will recall our October daytime meeting held at the Seaside Museum, where our Guest Speaker from DAF talked about the over-harvesting of gastropod and bivalve molluscs in Moreton Bay, some of it to supply restaurants illegally.  DAF has been investigating and gathering evidence over a number of years to ensure the over-harvesting can be addressed.  Many are asking for a total ban on harvesting these species to allow their numbers to return to normal and improve the health of the Moreton Bay Marine Park ecosystems.

The Survey can be found at this link:   https://www.daf.qld.gov.au/business-priorities/fisheries/consultations-and-legislation/reviews-surveys-and-consultations.

Follow the prompts to take part.

 

Background

Consultation on proposed changes to the management of gastropod and bivalve molluscs in Moreton Bay.

Fishing pressure directed at gastropods and bivalve molluscs in Moreton Bay has increased significantly in recent years resulting in concern about the sustainability of key species (mud ark and mud whelks). A key issue is limited compliance with current in-possession limits (50 per person) with large organised groups of people targeting these species excessively.

Gastropods and bivalve mollusc species are highly susceptible to localised depletion because of their sedentary nature and the ease of access to fishing grounds adjacent to urban centres.

Fisheries Queensland anticipates that fishing pressure and demand for these fisheries resources will continue and management action is required to protect intertidal shellfish populations and support rebuilding of populations to sustainable levels.

Initial consultation with some local stakeholders, the Moreton Bay Working Group and the Sustainable Fisheries Expert Panel has been undertaken.  Communiques are available online athttps://www.daf.qld.gov.au/business-priorities/fisheries/sustainable-fisheries-strategy.  Fisheries Queensland is now seeking additional feedback through public consultation on the following management changes to the Fisheries Regulation 2008:

  • Prohibit the take of gastropods and bivalve mollusc, excluding pipis, in Moreton Bay;
  • Clarify the definition of mollusc to assist compliance activities:
  1.     Gastropod means any invertebrate species belonging to taxonomic Class Gastropoda
  2.     Bivalve Mollusc means any invertebrate species belonging to taxonomic Class Bivalvia

        iii.    Pipi means any invertebrate species belonging to taxonomic Family Donacidae.

  • Clarify that shell collecting (i.e. empty shells, no live organisms) is not a regulated activity.

It is proposed that the closure will apply to the waters of Moreton Bay following  the boundary coordinates of the northern, eastern and southern boundaries of the Moreton Bay Marine Park and all tidal waters of rivers flowing into this region and encompass the existing foreshore closures at Wynnum, Nudgee Beach, Bramble Bay and Deception Bay.

The closure would not apply to pipis or worms, and would only apply to bivalve molluscs and gastropods such as mud welks, cockles and mud arks.

There will be no changes to the harvesting of gastropods and bivalve mollusc outside the Moreton Bay area (i.e. outside Moreton Bay a person is allowed to be in possession of 50).

An online survey is regarding the proposed management action is available at https://www.daf.qld.gov.au/business-priorities/fisheries/consultations-and-legislation/reviews-surveys-and-consultations and will be open for comment until 6 January 2019.

If you have any questions please contact John Kung, Senior Fisheries Manager, on 3087 8027 or by email at John.Kung@daf.qld.gov.au.

Claire Andersen
Executive Director (Fisheries and Forestry)
Department of Agriculture and Fisheries

http://birdlife.org.au/media/disturbing-toondah-harbour-revelations-underscore-urgent-need-for-stronger/

Disturbing Toondah Harbour revelations
6 December 2018

Shocking revelations about the national assessment process for the proposed Toondah Harbour development in Queensland is further evidence Australia needs stronger national environment laws and an independent umpire for project approvals, leading conservation organisations have declared.

This morning the ABC revealed then-Environment Minister Josh Frydenberg was advised by his department on multiple occasions the Toondah Harbour apartment and marina proposal should be rejected outright because of the damage it would do to an internationally protected wetland.

Only a handful of developments have ever been rejected under current national environment laws.

Documents show Minister Frydenberg in at least one instance rejected this advice and instead sent the development to the next stage of assessment. Other documents obtained by the ABC reveal the Queensland Government was also willing to remove areas from the internationally protected wetland to facilitate the development.

Donor Annual Returns lodged with the Australian Electoral Commission show the Toondah Harbour proponent, Walker Corporation, gave $225,000 to the Federal Liberal Party and $23,000 to the Queensland ALP in 2015-16 – the year the initial development proposal was submitted for national assessment. Documents obtained by the ABC suggest Walker Corporation also engaged in a campaign of legal challenges and lobbying to keep the project alive.

The Toondah Harbour development would destroy approximately 40 hectares of the internationally protected Moreton Bay Ramsar site – one of Australia’s most important migratory shorebird feeding and breeding wetland habitats. A third version of the development is currently at the second-stage of assessment under national environment law.

Australian Conservation Foundation (ACF) Chief Executive Officer, Kelly O’Shanassy, said Australians should question whether state and federal elected representatives have been acting in the best interests of nature or those of a significant donor, in not striking out the Toondah Harbour development.

“There needs to be an independent probe into this matter. Australians have the right to be confident the natural world is being protected from irresponsible development, especially places as important as the Moreton Bay Ramsar site,” Ms O’Shanassy said.

BirdLife Australia Chief Executive Officer, Paul Sullivan, said the project should never have proceeded to this stage.

“The proposal to build 3,600 waterside apartments and a marina on a Ramsar site flies in the face of Australia’s international obligations. The Minister should have followed the advice of his own department and rejected this project outright,” Mr Sullivan said.

“Critically endangered migratory shorebirds like the Eastern Curlew rely on this important wetland for their survival. If approved, Toondah will set a dangerous precedent for 2,331 Ramsar sites around the world. The international community is watching what happens next.”

Humane Society International Australia Chief Executive Officer, Erica Martin, said the revelations highlight the urgent need for new environment laws in Australia.

“It is unacceptable that matters of national environmental significance are being ignored in the decision making process for major developments like Toondah Harbour. Australia needs stronger nature laws and a national Environment Protection Authority to take the politics out of these decisions and to ensure native wildlife and their habitats are given the protection they truly deserve,” Ms Martin said.

“The Department was right on the money in saying this proposal should be rejected outright, and it’s disturbing that Minister Frydenberg ignored this advice and opened the door to removing international protections for the sake of development. The Moreton Bay Ramsar site is priceless, and Australia must respect the conventions we’ve committed to.”

Koalasign

South East Queensland Koala Forums

Do you like this?

Albany Creek Koala Forum

Tuesday, November 27, 2018 at 06:00 PM · 14 rsvps

KoalaCrossing.jpg

We’ve all seen it!

The ever encroaching urban sprawl is seeing hectare after hectare of urban bushland and important habitat being cleared before our eyes. Our communities are changing, a (show all)


Ipswich Koala Forum – Planning Laws & Habitat Loss

Sunday, December 09, 2018 at 11:00 AM · 22 rsvps

KoalaCrossing.jpg

We’ve all seen it!

The ever encroaching urban sprawl is seeing hectare after hectare of urban bushland and important habitat being cleared before our eyes. Our communities are changing, a (show all)


Toowong Koala Forum – Planning Laws, Habitat Loss & Koalas

Monday, December 10, 2018 at 06:00 PM · 13 rsvps

KoalaCrossing.jpg

We’ve all seen it!

The ever encroaching urban sprawl is seeing hectare after hectare of urban bushland and important habitat being cleared before our eyes. Our communities are changing, a (show all)


Yeronga Koala Forum – Planning Laws, Habitat Loss & Koalas

Tuesday, December 11, 2018 at 06:00 PM · 27 rsvps
Yeronga Community Center in Yeronga , Australia

KoalaCrossing.jpg

We’ve all seen it!

The ever encroaching urban sprawl is seeing hectare after hectare of urban bushland and important habitat being cleared before our eyes. Our communities are changing, a (show all)


Beenleigh Koala Forum – Planning Laws, Urban Deforestation, and Saving the Koala in SEQ

Wednesday, December 12, 2018 at 06:00 PM · 32 rsvps
Beenleigh Scout Hall in Beenleigh, Australia

KoalaCrossing.jpg

We’ve all seen it!

The ever encroaching urban sprawl is seeing hectare after hectare of urban bushland and important habitat being cleared before our eyes. Our communities are changing, a (show all)


West End Forum – Planning Laws, Habitat Loss & Koalas

Thursday, December 13, 2018 at 06:00 PM · 17 rsvps
Kurilpa Hall – West End in West End, Australia

KoalaCrossing.jpg

We’ve all seen it!

The ever encroaching urban sprawl is seeing hectare after hectare of urban bushland and important habitat being cleared before our eyes. Our communities are changing, a (show all)

See the latest news from the Queensland Conservation Council’s Save Moreton Bay campaign at: www.savemoretonbay.com.au